Fed Thought the Housing Bubble Was Hilarious: Ritholtz Chart

Barry Ritholtz is a Bloomberg View columnist writing about finance, the economy and the business world. He started the Big Picture blog in 2003 and is the founder of Ritholtz Wealth Management, an asset management and financial planning firm.
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Earlier this week, we considered the amount of laughter in Federal Open Market Committee meetings as a sign the Fed wasn't fully cognizant of the coming financial storm.

Today's chart (via Elliot-today) adds another component to this, overlaying the Fed's laughter with the Case-Shiller residential real-estate price index. Perhaps the best way to examine the contrast is as a function of mass psychology: The Fed appears to have become complacent, apparently relaxed and satisfied with the way it handled the aftermath of the dot-com/technology/telecom bubble that burst in 2000.

Sure, there is some form-fitting here as the FOMC chart is adjusted 6 months to make the two correlate. Regardless, it is the sort of coincidence that would rarely be noticed in real time and is terribly significant in hindsight.

I wonder what the Fed is laughing about now ...

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(Barry Ritholtz writes about finance, the economy and the business world for Bloomberg View. Follow him on Twitter @Ritholtz.)

To contact the author on this story:
Barry L Ritholtz at britholtz3@bloomberg.net