Happy Monday, View readers. On to my morning reads.

Global corporate bond sales lowest in five years

A plunge like this was bound to happen once interest rates for Treasuries started rising again. From the Financial Times: “Just $61bn in investment grade corporate debt has been raised so far in August, putting it on course to be the weakest month since 2008, according to data from Dealogic. In August last year, more than $121bn in new corporate debt was issued.”

Emerging markets are not part of Federal Reserve’s dual mandate

Coordinate monetary policy with other countries? Fed officials say it isn’t going to happen. “You have to remember that we are a legal creature of Congress and that we only have a mandate to concern ourselves with the interest of the United States,” says Dennis Lockhart, president of the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

The human tragedy of the Nasdaq trading halt

Randall Forsyth of Barron’s has a humorous take on last week’s breakdown at the Nasdaq Stock Market: “Do these companies actually exist if investors cannot trade claims on their future values? And if you own one of those claims, are they worth anything if you cannot obtain an instantaneous quote? This was a huge failing for the country, threatening our very national security.”

Big banks still holding the rest of us hostage

Stanford University economics professor Anat Admati, a longtime proponent of requiring banks to hold more capital, says the financial system is no safer than it was five years. “We will never have a safe and healthy global financial system until banks are forced to rely much more on money from their owners and shareholders to finance their loans and investments,” she writes in the New York Times.

Housing market roars back in South Florida

Remember, this area was a huge part of the housing bust. From the Sun-Sentinel of South Florida: “In Boca Raton, it seems the real estate market is ready to party like it’s 2005 again.” The city’s zoning board approved “the first large scale, single-family home project in nearly a decade.” The development would have 223 homes no smaller than 4,300 square feet, starting at $1.2 million each.

(Jonathan Weil is a Bloomberg View columnist. Follow him on Twitter.)