Tumblr Inc. users were not too happy about the news yesterday that Yahoo! Inc. had approved a $1.1 billion bid to buy the blogging platform, popular among the creative, the young and the social-media savvy.

Searching the tag “Yahoo” on Tumblr uncovers legions of the discontented: GIFs galore -- of a guy punching a screen, a “Tumblr" cat fighting a “Yahoo” baby and new terms and conditions to kill creativity. An image of Tumblr Chief Executive Officer David Karp stamped with the scarlet seal of “traitor” had been reblogged more than 30 times by yesterday night.

There’s also, of course, the porn problem: A pornographic site is among the 20 most popular Tumblr blogs, according to Quantcast Corp. As Joshua Brustein writes in Bloomberg Businessweek, “considering that Yahoo is ostensibly interested in Tumblr for the advertising, it’s hard to see the environment getting any friendlier for pornographers on the network.” Will Yahoo come down on the “Porn Gif Havens” of Tumblr?

These reactions speak to concerns that a hip, innovative company may become something much more staid inside a corporate behemoth like Yahoo, the U.S.'s largest Web portal. Yahoo's acquisition of the popular photo-sharing site Flickr in 2005 wound up being a poor integration. Flickr's U.S. traffic has decreased from more than 16 million users per month in May 2012 to just more than 10 million in May 2013 -- and the Flickr app which Yahoo slapped together isn't among the top 50 in the list of free photo apps on iTunes.

But if handled properly, the Tumblr deal could be an opportunity for both the acquired and acquirer. As Yahoo challenges Google and Facebook in the $17.7 billion display ad market, the deal, CEO Marissa Mayer's priciest acquisition to date, could help Yahoo get social-media and mobile advantages. Tumblr had more than 13 billion page views in the past month; more than 8 percent of that was mobile.

Meanwhile, Tumblr has been under increased pressure from investors to produce a profit. The company brought in only $13 million in revenue in 2012. Yahoo may be able to lend a hand there.

Tumblr will continue to host its more than 108 million blogs, and Karp will remain in charge of the website. That may give the Tumblr fan base something to cheer about: a promise that a post-acquisition Tumblr might maintain its editorial voice and feel.

What do you think of the deal? Share your thoughts in the comments below.

(Kirsten Salyer is social media editor for Bloomberg View. Follow her on Twitter.)